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Reference to the administrative-territorial division of Karelia


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At the 31st of March 1940 the Supreme Soviet of the USSR passed the law of the conversion from Karelian ASSR to Karelian-Finish Soviet Social Republic (KFSSR). The KFSSR included big part of the territory retroceded from Finland to the USSR under the piece treaty from the 12th of March 1940: Karelian Isthmus, west and north coast of Ladoga Lake, west territory out of Kandalaksha, a number of islands in Gulf of Finland. By the law of the Supreme Soviet of the KFSSR from the 9th of July 1940 seven administrative districts were formed on the new territory: Vyborg district, Kexholm district, Kurkijoki district, Pitkäranta district, Sortavala district, Suoiärvi district and Jääski district; by the decree of the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet of the KFSSR from the 27th of June 1940 three new village Soviets were formed in Kiestinki district: Alakurtti, Kairala and Kuolajärvi village Soviets.

Next years a number of essential modifications was made in the administrative-territorial division of the KFSSR. By the decree of the Presidium of the Suprime Soviet of the USSR from the 24th of November 1944 Vyborg, Kexholm and Jääski districts were retroceded to Leningrad Region.

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By the decree of the Presidium of the Suprime Soviet of the USSR from the 24th of February 1955 Alakurtti village Soviet of Kiestinki district was given to Kandalaksha district of Murmansk region.

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At the 16th of July 1956 the Suprime Soviet of the USSR passed the law of the conversion from the KFSSR to Karelian Autonomous Soviet Social Republik and of its inclusion in the RFSSR, passing the law the Suprime Soviet of the USSR considered the happend changes in the national population of the Republic, economic communion, close economic and cultural tides of Karelia and the RFSSR and Republic's labor requests as well.

After the conversion from the KFSSR to the KASSR great work on improvement of the Republic's administrative-territotial devision and districts' enlagement continued. In 1957 were abolished Pitkäranta district (the district's territory retroceded to Sortavala and Olonets districts), Petrovsky district (the district's territory retroceded to Suoiärvi and Kondopoga districts) and Kurkijoki district in 1958 (the districts territory was included in Sortavala district).

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According the resolution of Plenum of Central Committee of CPSU (Communist Party of the Soviet Union) (November, 1962) by the decree of the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet of the RFSSR from the 1st of February 1963 the new administrative division was established; six industrial areas were formed: Belomorsk, Kem, Kondopoga, Pudozh, Segezha, Suoärvi and four agricultural areas were formed: Medvezhegorsk, Olonets, Priladozhsky, Prionezhsky.

In 1965 industrial and agrcultural areas were converted to areas of Karelian ASSR. ...Priladozhsky district was renamed to Sortavala with the centre in Sortavala town.

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In 1966 new districs were formed on the republic's territory: ...Pitkäranta (including labour communities: Impilahti, Läskelä, Salmi, Harlu, Räimälä viliage Soviet)...

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In 1970 Sortavala district was abrogated. Therefore industrial communities Valaam and Värtsilä, village Soviets - Ojavoinen, Prigorodny, Rautakangas, Ruskeala were given to administrative subordination of Sortavala town Soviet of working people's deputies. Lahdenpohia town, Elisenvaara industrial community, village Soviets - Kurkijoki, Lahdenpohja, Raivattala were included to newformed Lahdenpohja district. In 1972 village Helylä was excluded from Sortavala town limit and industrial community Helylä with administrative subordination of Sortavala town Soviet was formed.

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Therefore, to the end of 1974 Karelian ASSR included 15 administrative districts: Belomorsk, Kalevala, Kem, Kondopoga, Lahdenpohja, Louhi, Medvezhegorsk, Muezersky, Olonet, Pitkäranta, Prionezhsky, Priazha, Pudozh, Segezha, Suoiärvi.

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1975

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